February 10th, 2015
Carbon exists in a variety of structural motifs as a result of its ability to adopt sp-, sp2-, and sp3-type bonding modes. Graphite, diamond, lonsdaleite (hexagonal diamond) are well-established allotropic forms of carbon, but in recent years fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene and even amorphous carbon have received a increasing attention...
February 10th, 2015
Natural gas is a significant component of the US energy economy, but in order for its potential to be realized in the transportation sector, the challenges of on-board natural gas storage need to be addressed. Natural gas liquefaction is an energy-intensive and expensive cryogenic process, and attaining viable energy densities by...
December 9th, 2014
New work from Carnegie's Ivan Naumov and Russell Hemley delves into the chemistry underlying some surprising recent observations about hydrogen and reveals remarkable parallels between hydrogen and graphene under extreme pressure. Their work is the cover story in the December issue of Accounts of Chemical Research. Hydrogen...
December 9th, 2014
Nearly one-tenth of the world’s electricity comes from fission-generated nuclear power, and most reactors use uranium dioxide or a mixed oxide containing 90% uranium oxide as a fuel. Although studies of the solid and its melting behavior are challenging as a result of the high temperatures required as well as the reactivity of UO2, data...
November 17th, 2014
Silicon is the second most-abundant element in the Earth's crust. When purified, it takes on a diamond structure, which is essential to modern electronic devices--carbon is to biology as silicon is to technology. A team of Carnegie scientists including EFree Associate Director Timothy Strobel and EFree Research Scientist Duck Young Kim...
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